Two Types Of Diabetes & How They Differ

There are two main types of diabetes, which consists of Type I diabetes and Type II diabetes. It is important to understand the distinction between the two and how both are treated.

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is commonly found in children and/or adolescents, but may sometimes occur in adults. With Type 1 diabetes, there is almost always a complete deficiency of insulin. As a result, the most common treatment is insulin injections, a lifestyle that consists of both diet and exercise and regular monitoring of blood glucose levels with the use of blood testing monitors. Patients who have been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes can continue to enjoy a normal life provided they continue with their treatment and take special care to follow their doctor’s instructions and/or recommendation.

Type 2 Diabetes

With Type 2 diabetes, an individual’s insulin level can be either normal, elevated or low. Even Type 2 diabetes can have two causes. One, where the pancreas stops producing enough insulin to balance glucose intake or two, where the cells stop absorbing insulin therefore cannot counter the effects of glucose. Type 2 diabetes is believed to be more complicated than Type 1, but ironically is thought to be easier to treat. Because insulin is still being produced inside the body, Type 2 diabetes often goes undetected for years. Symptoms are milder and may even be sporadic, which often reduces the level of concern. The main problem with Type 2 diabetes going unnoticed is the potential for serious complications, including renal failure and coronary artery disease. The initial treatment phase of Type 2 diabetes will likely include a lifestyle adjustment to feature increased physical activity and a diet that is geared toward weight loss. The next step, if necessary, will be medication and possibly insulin therapy if needed.

Both types of diabetes require that the patient maintain normal blood glucose levels in an effort to reduce the possibility of organ damage, including eyesight, kidney, blood circulation, etc. In order for this to occur, patients must carefully monitor their food intake and make sure to participate in regular exercise, all the while continuing to monitor their blood glucose level.

As of 2015, there is no known cure for diabetes. A chronic disease that effects many, diabetes is best treated through patient education, nutrition, self awareness and long-term care. In addition, patients are often urged to be aware of other symptoms that may indicate complications arising from diabetes.

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The contents of this article are to be used for informational purposes only. It should not be used in conjunction with, or in place of, professional medical advice relating to diabetes. This article must not be used as a basis for diagnosing or treating diabetes, but rather an informational source designed to explain the difference between the two types. For further information, a diagnosis or recommended treatment method for diabetes, individuals should consult a licensed physician.

7 Tips For Getting Started With Exercise for Diabetes

Getting exercise is a crucial part of staying healthy, especially when you are dealing with a chronic disease. It helps not only your physical health, but your mental health as well. Here are some tips on preparing yourself to take the first leap.

1. Start with small goals

You don’t have to wake up and run a marathon. You don’t even have to go running. If it’s what your fitness requires: start by walking. Use a pedometer like Fitbit, Withings Plus or Garmin Vivofit to track your steps. It is generally recommended that you walk 10,000 steps a day to start getting fitter. If you can do that: great. If not: start with as much as you can and gradually increase the distance. Whichever the case, don’t forget that you need to try to extend your comfort zone. When you start getting tired: go a little more!

2. Measure your glucose level

Before you do any exercise, you MUST measure your glucose level. If your blood glucose level is fine, then you start your exercise. Initially try to measure your glucose level often even during exercise, so you get a feel of how your body reacts to it (a CGM is recommended). Log your measurements in an app like laborom so you can see trends in how exercise effects you levels. Also: ALWAYS bring glucagon or any fast acting carbohydrates in case you get a low during your workout.

3. Measure your weight

Your weight is a good benchmark of how well your exercise is effecting your health. Don’t worry if you don’t lose a lot of weight all of a sudden. First your body needs to build muscles to get used to the exercise, and muscle tissue is heavier than fat tissue. You can also track your weight change in laborom and you might want to think about uploading pictures of yourself to the app for each measurement so you can see how your physique is changing over time. Often, even though your weight doesn’t decrease much your shape can improve tremendously.

4. Avoid fast-food

Fast-foods are usually pumped with artificial ingredients which can really mess with your blood sugar levels. Try to eat healthy foods like salads and generally low-carb meals. Whenever you exercise bring your own food so you know perfectly well how your body will react to it.

5. Time, consistency, habit

Probably the first time you go out for a walk or a jog it will be when some time frees up in your calendar and you have nothing better to do. When you finished your exercise and took a nice shower sit down and try to think how you could fit this into your busy schedule at least 3 times a week. Make a game plan and stick to it! Try to form a habit of doing this.

6. Bring a friend

For security, or for company get a friend to join you. Exercising together with someone is always more fun and interesting. They can also help you out if you should need anything. This is especially a good idea while you and your body are still getting used to the workout.

7. Reward yourself

After each exercise treat yourself to something that you would otherwise not do or get for yourself. It doesn’t have to be a big gesture, it doesn’t even have to cost money. You just have to feel better for doing it. This will help with making a workout into a habit.

Do you have your own tips that helped you get started? Is there a pro-tip you can share with the community? Let us know in the comments!