How To Organise Your Medical Records With Ease

Raise your hand if you have all your medical records (lab results, x-rays, release documents, measurements) neatly stored in one place, organised by date and type of record. Yeah… I thought so. I think it’s about time to sort things out. No, it doesn’t take long. No, it’s not complicated. Yes, just take a photo of your papers with our app.

I assume by now you’ve guessed what this post is about. We just rolled out a new feature to manage your medical history so you can easily visualise and understand your past health related events. From now on, beside your self-measurements, you can also upload results you received from your doctor just by snapping a photo of them. You can also enter any medical procedures that you may have had. We are already working on the web version of this feature so you will soon (i.e. in a couple of days) be able to see your med records on a neat timeline on the monitor of your computer. We are also working on something VERY cool that helps you make use of the information you store in the Laborom cloud, but I can’t tell you what it is just yet. Hang tight… you’ll love this!

Oh,  there is one more thing: you can also set future events (i.e. reminders) in the Medical Records feature that will help you remember doctor’s appointments. 😉 After the appointment these automatically turn into an entry in your medical history.

That’s it for today.


If you think we are on the right track then don’t forget to download our app for iOS and Android!

Laborom Gets Pumped: Exciting New Features!

Since the release of the 2.0 version of laborom in September we spent a lot of time listening to your feedback and implementing changes that were important to you. There were many incremental changes that we made, but we also prepared some new features to the system on the way to becoming the go-to app for people living with chronic diseases like diabetes.

Here are some functions we have added to laborom v2.1:

Infobox

The Infobox appears as a new card on the dashboard where we provide you with various up-to-date information about health related topics, features and updates.

Automatic reminders

This was probably the most requested feature through the Help Center in laborom. From now on, once you enter a before-meal blood glucose reading you will get a reminder in 75 minutes to measure and record your BG again.

One more thing…

Share the love <3

We thought you might want to tell other people how much you love laborom, so we made it easier for you. :) Just open the menu in the app and hit share on the bottom to show us your support. Thank you!

Thanks for staying with us and we’ll keep you posted on important releases; which actually you can now see in your app in the Infobox as well.

Have something to add? Let us know in the comments below.

You can download laborom for Android and iOS here:

Great Conversations At The First Beating Diabetes With Technology Meetup

Talk about ways to change the future of diabetes with technological advancements filled the room even before the meetup kicked off. In fact it was already the subject of the elevator ride to the 6th floor of the prestigious Paris Department Store building in downtown Budapest, where the event took place.

Even though this was only the first in a series of meetups about beating diabetes with technology (#BDTech) already 80 people showed interest in this topic. A great mix of people from all different angles showed up to discuss the ever-evolving theme of needs and solutions in monitoring, management and therapy in diabetes. Attendees included hardware manufacturing company and local market leader in glucose monitoring devices, innovative pharmaceutical companies, patients, advocates, bloggers, developers and last but not least doctors.

The conversation was kicked off by Levente Szasz, CEO of the company creating digital diabetes diary application laborom, who is also one of the organisers of the first meetup. Levente talked about why it is important to talk about possible technological advancements in diabetes management and their plans about expanding the meetup into an international series. He also introduced their recently rebuilt application. “This was a great opportunity for us to talk with stakeholders from various sides and get their input on the direction we are heading with laborom”, Levente noted. “We received some invaluable input that we will hurry to implement as soon as possible” he added with a smile.

Dr. Daniel Vegh, also an organiser of the #BDTech meetup and founder of DYA Europe and IDB (Youth Diabetes Blog and Movement / Ifjúsági Diabétesz Blog és Mozgalom) – a blog and a movement to support youngsters going through the same problems Daniel had being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 19 – followed by giving tips on how to get involved with diabetes communities and how to activate patients to become their own innovators. Daniel is also the founder of the first Hungarian football team for people dealing with diabetes, aptly called FC DiaBeaters. “When laborom approached me to co-organise this meetup series I was really enthusiastic about it and now I’m really happy that so many people were interested in our first occasion.” Daniel said. “It is great to see so many people and companies alike wanting to be part of the change and the community that can help make this change come alive. After all, this was one of my goals when I started IDB. And I guess this is the part where I add that we are looking for people who would like to organise chapters of this event in their local community. “ Daniel added.

7 Tips For Getting Started With Exercise for Diabetes

Getting exercise is a crucial part of staying healthy, especially when you are dealing with a chronic disease. It helps not only your physical health, but your mental health as well. Here are some tips on preparing yourself to take the first leap.

1. Start with small goals

You don’t have to wake up and run a marathon. You don’t even have to go running. If it’s what your fitness requires: start by walking. Use a pedometer like Fitbit, Withings Plus or Garmin Vivofit to track your steps. It is generally recommended that you walk 10,000 steps a day to start getting fitter. If you can do that: great. If not: start with as much as you can and gradually increase the distance. Whichever the case, don’t forget that you need to try to extend your comfort zone. When you start getting tired: go a little more!

2. Measure your glucose level

Before you do any exercise, you MUST measure your glucose level. If your blood glucose level is fine, then you start your exercise. Initially try to measure your glucose level often even during exercise, so you get a feel of how your body reacts to it (a CGM is recommended). Log your measurements in an app like laborom so you can see trends in how exercise effects you levels. Also: ALWAYS bring glucagon or any fast acting carbohydrates in case you get a low during your workout.

3. Measure your weight

Your weight is a good benchmark of how well your exercise is effecting your health. Don’t worry if you don’t lose a lot of weight all of a sudden. First your body needs to build muscles to get used to the exercise, and muscle tissue is heavier than fat tissue. You can also track your weight change in laborom and you might want to think about uploading pictures of yourself to the app for each measurement so you can see how your physique is changing over time. Often, even though your weight doesn’t decrease much your shape can improve tremendously.

4. Avoid fast-food

Fast-foods are usually pumped with artificial ingredients which can really mess with your blood sugar levels. Try to eat healthy foods like salads and generally low-carb meals. Whenever you exercise bring your own food so you know perfectly well how your body will react to it.

5. Time, consistency, habit

Probably the first time you go out for a walk or a jog it will be when some time frees up in your calendar and you have nothing better to do. When you finished your exercise and took a nice shower sit down and try to think how you could fit this into your busy schedule at least 3 times a week. Make a game plan and stick to it! Try to form a habit of doing this.

6. Bring a friend

For security, or for company get a friend to join you. Exercising together with someone is always more fun and interesting. They can also help you out if you should need anything. This is especially a good idea while you and your body are still getting used to the workout.

7. Reward yourself

After each exercise treat yourself to something that you would otherwise not do or get for yourself. It doesn’t have to be a big gesture, it doesn’t even have to cost money. You just have to feel better for doing it. This will help with making a workout into a habit.

Do you have your own tips that helped you get started? Is there a pro-tip you can share with the community? Let us know in the comments!

Toddlers with Diabetes

Toddlers with diabetes are suffering from Type 1 diabetes, also known as juvenile diabetes or diabetes juvenile. The number of children under the age of five being diagnosed with diabetes juvenile has almost doubled in the past five years. Caring for toddlers is a challenge under the best of circumstances, and toddlers with diabetes need even more special care and attention.

Symptoms

First, if you are wondering whether your toddler has diabetes in the first place, here are some signs to look for:

  • often complains of feeling thirsty
  • hungry more often
  • suddenly loses weight
  • urinates more than usual, diapers more wet than usual
  • occasional fruity smelling breath

If you notice any of these symptoms in your child, discuss with your doctor the possibility you have a toddler with diabetes.

Special challenges

You or your caregiver will have to closely monitor your child’s blood sugar throughout the day to be sure it stays within a safe range. Ideally this means 6-12 mmol just before meals.

Toddlers with diabetes also require daily insulin shots, which can be traumatic for you as well as your child! When administering both finger pricks for the blood sugar tests and the insulin shots, you should be as quick and calm as possible about the procedure. If your child is playing, go where he or she is rather than having them come to you. That helps establish the procedure as just a normal part of their day.

Of course, your child will resist these procedures, and it can be hard for parents and caregivers to remember they are doing this for the child’s health. It must be done, however, and you may have to learn to restrain the child gently. It also helps to give them a big hug and a kiss after it’s finished to make sure they understand you still love them even though this hurt a bit.

Another problem is that toddlers with diabetes can’t tell you when they are feeling the effects of low blood sugar, which is another reason for careful monitoring.
Toddlers in general can be picky eaters, and toddlers with diabetes are no different. The challenge here is in making sure that all your alternatives fit within a healthy and appropriate diabetic diet. Have as wide a selection of those foods available as possible so that when they do refuse certain foods, you can tempt them with an appropriate alternative.

Toddlers with diabetes should otherwise develop the same way, and at the same rate, as other children of their age. So as long as you take the necessary precautions to treat the diabetes, and your child seems normal in all other ways, there’s no reason why he or she shouldn’t be a perfectly healthy and happy child.